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ExtremcoralsTropic Marin Elimi Phos LonglifeARKAPreis AquaristikAquapro2000
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Dear visitor,

Welcome to reeflex.net, the interactive online encyclopedia for marine life worldwide. It is currently available in ten languages. Founded in the year 2000 by a group of enthusiastic reef keepers the reeflex community’s aim originally has been to collect and to share information on the husbandry and behaviour of marine fish, invertebrates and corals kept in captivity.

Over the years and due to the brilliant images well-known underwater photographers have contributed, it has also attracted more and more recreational divers who, in turn, attribute their photos and comments on their sightings to reeflex.
And so reeflex has developed into a comprehensive database for the identification of marine species.

As an interactive online encyclopedia reeflex.net lives on the shared experience of its users, whether they are divers, saltwater aquarists or other people interested in marine biology, and we welcome you to attribute your images, videos and comments. The intention of reeflex.net, however, is to provide a serious and reliable source of reference for all its users, so please note that we only accept useful contributions with a well-sounded basis in knowledge or experience as well as high-quality images or videos. Any comments not matching these criteria, containing obviously wrong information, etc. may be deleted by an administrator without notice.

reeflex.net is not a platform for discussions. If you have any questions about care requirements of an individual marine species or the setup of your tank, you may use the shout box in the column on the right-hand side. Alternatively you can post your question in one of the numerous reef keeping forums.

As you will see the general information for every listed marine species which may be kept in captivity contains recommendations on the size of the tank. These are meant to serve as a guideline for you. Although these recommendations are based on the long-term observances of experienced reef keepers, it is rather difficult to determine the correct tank size, since the well-being of marine fish, invertebrates or corals in captivity is not only dependent on the mere size of the tank, but also closely associated with how the tank is structured, how much swimming space will be available as well as what kind of other marine animals are already living in the tank etc. It is in the interest of each responsible reef keeper to thoroughly inform himself and to check whether he will be able to fulfill its needs before he introduces a new animal into his tank.

Once again thank you very much for your interest and we hope that you do enjoy your visit to reeflex.net

Your reeflex team

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What's that ?  
Comments
 

From: Elisabeth
Topic: Calcinus tubularis
Comment:
Diesen Einsiedler pflege ich seit 3 Jahren. Ich habe ihn mit einem gebrauchten Becken übernommen. Vermutlich ist er mindestens 4 Jahre alt. 

 

 

From: BEASTIEPENDENT
Topic: What's that ?
Comment:
Mit den Zacken am Vorderen Seitenrand und dem eher unbeborstetem Carapax erinnert sie mich eher an http://www.meerwasser-lexikon.de/tiere/5305_Pilumnus_aestuarii.htm – aber Mittelmeer ist wohl eher unwahrscheinlich.

Jedenfalls eine Pilumnus sp., das hast du richtig herausgefunden, Muelly! ;) Räuberisch, möglicherweise lieber abgeben oder Technikbecken.


Maat et joot, 'ne schöne Jrooß & bess demnähx, Ollie/BEASTIE

E-Mail: beastie@panzerwelten.de
• www.Panzerwelten.de • www.Meerwasser-Lexikon.de 

 

 

From: Meeerwasser
Topic: What's that ?
Comment:
Ich hatte auch Leslie Harris um Rat gefragt und umgehend diese Antwort erhalten:

Your worms are amphinomidae. I have never received specimens of this type from aquarists for examination although it is the most common species found in reef tanks. They may be juveniles of Eurythoe complanata, another Eurythoe species, or belong to a different genus. They are not Hermodice or Pherecardia which are voracious predators on corals, crabs, worms, etc., as well as scavengers and which should be removed immediately. Eurythoe are primarily detritus feeders, herbivores, and scavengers. They will not eat healthy coral as far as I know but as scavengers they are attracted to diseased and rotting flesh so they will eat sick, wounded, or dying coral. As a result they are often blamed for coral mortality when they are only scavenging. Much less is known about feeding in the other amphinomid genera. The small ones you have are primarily detritus & algae eaters based on what we know from reef tanks; I'm willing to bet that they are scavengers as well. As you've probably read, their numbers will go up if you overfeed a tank & decrease when the food supply goes down.

They should not hurt your corals. I say should not instead of won't because invertebrates don't read our reference books and don't know how they are supposed to act. There is always a possibility that if they are starving they will start eating things they don't normally eat . However, if they have been in your algae refuge for a while and your corals are healthy then they have proved themselves harmless under normal conditions. 

 

 

From: Muelly
Topic: What's that ?
Comment:
Hallo NeuerBenutzer,
ich tippe auf Pilumnus sp.Sieht diesen hier recht ähnlich wie ich finde http://www.meerwasser-lexikon.de/tiere/2885_Pilumnus_cfhirtellus.htm
lg von Muelly 

 

 

From: Elisabeth
Topic: What's that ?
Comment:
Siehe unter: Eurythoe

VG
Elisabeth 

 

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